How Much Acid To Lower Ph In Pool Water? [Answered!]

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In the spring of 2015, a woman in South Carolina named Amanda Hurst wrote a powerful blog post titled, “How Much Acidity Should You Add To Your Pool To Safely Pool-Wade?” The answer, as I hope you’ll agree, is: as little as possible!

Ms. Hurst was seeking a way to safely enjoy her time in the water with her kids. While her primary pool is undoubtedly equipped with all the necessary safety features (fence, security cameras, automatic alarms), she wanted something extra – something that would allow her to enjoy her days in the pool without worrying about whether or not she and her children were safe.

After a few weeks of trial and error, Ms. Hurst discovered that adding a bit of acidity to her pool was the key to creating the perfect environment for enjoyable summertime relaxation. As it turns out, the answer was even simpler than she thought! All she needed to do was add some pool chlorine and she’d be good to go.

Why Add Acid To Your Pool?

Ms. Hurst was a bit surprised by this unexpected discovery because, until that point, she’d always heard that adding more acid to your pool would be bad for the environment.

The truth, as it turns out, is that adding acid to your pool actually benefits both the environment and the people who use it. Here’s why:

Acidic Cleaning

One of the reasons why acid is so effective at removing dirt and grime from your pool is that it is highly acidic. In fact, the pH of pool water can vary anywhere between 4 and 9, with the most prevalent range being between 5 and 7. If the pH of your pool is below this range, then it will be extremely ineffective at cleaning the water. This is because the dirt and grime will not be picked up by the water due to its low pH. You can easily adjust the pH of your pool with the help of a pool vacuum with an automatic shut-off.

On the other hand, if the pH of your pool is above this range, then the water will become highly corrosive. Corrosive water is extremely dangerous because it can eat away at the things it comes in contact with. This includes the metals that form the roof, walls, and floor of your pool. Corrosive water will also eat away at the equipment, appliances, and furnishings that are in or around the pool area. In short, you don’t want to add acid to your pool if the pH is above 7.

Pools With High Alkalinity

Another benefit of adding acid to your pool is that it raises the alkalinity of the water. Alkalinity is the measure of minerals, such as calcium and magnesium, that make up the building blocks of bones and teeth. In general, the higher the alkalinity of the water the healthier it is for your pool. This is because these minerals help maintain the proper structural integrity of the bones and teeth in the body. These minerals also help keep your water clean by serving as a defense against disease-causing microorganisms.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were over 112,000 emergency room visits related to swimming pools in 2014. This is a 66% increase when compared to the number of patients who attended pools in 2003. It’s likely that many of these patients had acute injuries related to the hyper alkalinity of the water. The good news is that these patients are likely to be saved by medication or pool water treatments, which decrease the damage and promote healing. On the other hand, treating the injury-causing microbes within the water will help prevent these sorts of accidents in the future.

Adding acid to your pool is an excellent option for those who want to avoid these injuries and accidents while also promoting health and safety within the water. In short, it’s a win-win situation!

How Much Acid Should You Add?

Now that you know the key benefits of adding acid to your pool, you may be wondering how much of it should you actually add. To answer this question, it’s important to take a few things into consideration. The first and most vital thing to do is determine how you will be using the pool. If you are a hobbyist who simply wants to swim and hang out with friends and family then feel free to add as much as you want! On the other hand, if you are a professional who wants to keep the pool clean for long days and nights then be sure to add less than what is recommended by your pool equipment manufacturer.

When it comes to adding acid to your pool, you also need to consider how much time you have available to tend to it. Most pool owners feel that four days a week is adequate for pool cleaning, leaving the other three days for swimming. If you have a busy schedule and feel that you can’t fit in regular cleaning then consider adding some chemicals during the week and leaving the pool clean for the weekend. This will help promote relaxation while at the same time keeping the water clean and clear.

In conclusion, if you are wondering how much acid to add to your pool then it’s important to consider a few things. The first and most vital thing to do is determine how you will be using the pool. If you want to swim then feel free to add as much as you want. On the other hand, if you are a professional who wants to keep the pool clean for long days and nights then be sure to add less than what is recommended by your pool equipment manufacturer.

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