How Much Does Pool Water Cost In Massachusetts? [Fact Checked!]

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So you have just bought that brand new infinity pool. Or are you planning to buy one soon? Congratulations! Pool ownership is certainly a lot of fun and relaxing, especially in the summer, but it can also be quite challenging. After all, the bills will keep coming in, and you will need to pay for it somehow. Perhaps you have decided to go for a Gold Medal and save up for a proper pool filled with glorious water. No matter what your reason is, it is essential that you know how expensive pool water can be. Let’s have a look, shall we?

The Overall Average Cost Of A Pool

If you are planning to buy a pool in general, then it is essential that you know the overall average cost of one. As it turns out, this can vary a lot according to the size and the location. For instance, large pools in resort areas or exclusive clubs can cost you thousands of dollars, while a small in-ground pool in your back yard will set you back a few hundred bucks. To give you a general idea, here is a short list of the average cost of a pool in different parts of the country.

New York

In New York, where it costs more to live simply because it is more expensive to travel there, pool ownership is certainly not a cheap option. A large inground pool will set you back an average of $25,000, with the smaller and more common pools costing around $15,000. If you want to take a look online at the current market value of a pool in New York, then you should do some research first to make sure that you are not getting ripped off. In general, New York is a pricey place to reside, and although the weather is beautiful, the prices reflect this. If you are looking to buy a pool as an investment, then consider moving to Florida or another cost-effective place. For example, in Palm Beach County, Florida, you will find lovely little oasis-like pools that cost only $2000 per season.

California

Moving along, to California where the weather is gorgeous and the cost of living is high. An average pool in a California county will set you back $10,000+, with the most luxurious pools costing up to a million. Once again, the costs can vary a lot from one county to another, so be sure to do your research before committing. In general, if you want to buy a pool as an investment, then consider moving to Texas, where the cost of living is much lower, and you will get an excellent return on your investment.

Florida

Moving on to Florida, where warm temperatures and beautiful beaches are the norm. The cost of living is extremely low, which is reflected in the price of a pool. An average inground pool in a Florida county will set you back around $7000 per season, with the most luxurious ones costing up to a million. Once again, the variances are significant, so be sure to do your research before committing.

As a general guideline, pools that are at least 6′ deep and are not heavily used are not likely to cost you very much. For smaller pools, you will need to do a bit of research to be sure that the expenses are within your means. Otherwise, you are likely to be conned by the sales person, since this is a common practice in this industry. In general, it is advisable to buy a used pool, and as long as it is in good condition and has not been vandalized or infested by bugs, you will have nothing to worry about. Otherwise, it will be costly to have it cleaned and sanitized before using it again.

The Northeast

Moving north, to the northeast, where it gets cold and windy, and the bill for pool water is pretty high. A large inground pool will set you back an average of $22,000 in New York, with smaller, common pools costing around $16,000. As for the other two regions, Pennsylvania and Maine, they will have you paying a fortune for pool water. For example, in the state of Pennsylvania, you will need to pay around $28,500 for a large pool, with the smaller pools costing around $21,000. Moving across to Maine, where the winters are cold and damp, and the average pool will cost you around $27,000. These are not cheap places to live simply because of the costs of living there, but also because of the high cost of owning a pool. It can be tricky to find a good deal on a pool if you are not from there, so be sure to do your research first to make sure that you are not being tricked or conned by the sales person. In these areas, it is better to buy a used pool, because the costs of shipping, storing, and insuring a new pool are simply too high. It would be better to buy a vacation home elsewhere instead, unless you are feeling particularly generous.

The Midwest

Finally, we reach the midwest, where the weather is beautiful and temperatures are reasonable. An average pool in a midwest county will set you back around $12,000, with the most luxurious ones costing up to a million. As for the smaller pools, you will have to do some research to see how expensive they are, but in general, they will not cost you a fortune. In some parts of the country, the cost of living is low, so if you are looking to invest in a pool, then this is the place to do it. You will also find that the cost of shipping a pool is not that high, which is why it is relatively easy to find a good deal there. For a while, at least.

As a general rule, the larger the pool, the more you will spend on it simply because of the shipping costs. For small pools, it is best to do some research in your area to be sure that the expenses are within your means. Otherwise, you are likely to be conned by the sales person, who will try to up-sale you the expensive option simply because it is a common practice in this industry. In general, it is cheaper to buy a pre-made pool, which you will find in most yards for around $7000, instead of having to build one yourself. Even in this case, make sure to do your research first to be sure that you are not being tricked or conned by the sales person.

To give you an overall idea of how much pool water costs in different parts of the country, here is a short list of prices for different sized pools, averaged out over the course of a year.

As you can see, although living in a warmer climate, where it is not too hot and not too cold, the costs are actually pretty high. Owning a pool is certainly not an inexpensive option, and it can be tricky to find the right niche where you can make it worth your while. If you are looking for a way to make extra money, then consider taking in boarders, offering swimming classes or having a summer party for friends and family. In general, be smart about where you live and what you do for a living, because the costs of living in a certain place do affect your finances in ways you cannot predict. For example, if you are self-employed, then your taxes will be higher, and if you are retired, then you will have a better return on your investments.

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