How To Increase The Water Pressure In Pool Side? [Updated!]

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So you have just bought that brand new pool. Congrats! But, now that you have this piece of equipment in your backyard, you will want to work on increasing the pressure so that you can get the most out of your investment. Before you start messing around with the pressure, you should first make sure that your pool is functioning correctly. Once you have cleared that hurdle, you can start increasing the pressure. Here is a quick guide to help you out.

Test The Water With The Correct Gauge

Before you start increasing the pressure, you should first test the water with the correct gauge. This way, you can be sure that you are not damaging your pool or its ecosystem by raising the pressure too high. To test the water, take the following steps:

  • Turn on the supply side of your pool (this is the part that connects to the city water supply and usually is located near the faucet).
  • Remove the cap from the end of the tube that is connected to the spigot (this is the part that connects to the faucet).
  • Measure the pressure (usually indicated in PSI or PPOI (pounds per square inch or pounds per ounce of air)) with a gauge.

If you are using an analog gauge, take time to zero it out before you start testing the water. This way you can be sure that the gauge is ready to provide you with accurate results. Remember, the pressure will be greater the higher you set the valve so take time to learn how your pool handles high pressure before you go above what is considered normal. Some pools are designed to handle higher pressures, while others are not necessarily built for it. But, as long as you know what type of pool you have, you can be sure that you will be able to determine how to properly increase the water pressure.

Set The Pressure Level

After you have tested the water and know what type of pool you have, you can set the pressure level. When setting the pressure, it is important to remember that the higher the pressure, the greater the chance of damage to your pool. If you have a garden hose with you, you can use it to measure the pressure at different points along the length of the hose. To ensure that the pressure you set is sufficient, use the following formula:

  • Length x Width x Depth (of the pool)
  • (inches x inches x inches)
  • x 2
  • Fraction

For example, if your pool is 16 feet by 8 feet by 2 feet deep, your setting should be 16 x 8 x 2 = 832. You then need to add 2 to get the total pressure in PSI because there are 2 ways to release water from a pool (by filling it or letting it settle). You want to ensure that you do not overshoot and damage your pool. So, you will want to set the pressure at 833 PSI to be on the safe side. If you are using a digital gauge, you can input the desired pressure into the gauge and it will automatically tell you the maximum capacity it can handle (usually indicated in PSI or PPOI).

Check The Valves

As previously stated, your pool has two ways of releasing water into the tank. One is through the use of a pump and the other is by manually releasing the water. The latter usually occurs when you are doing some underwater cleaning or maintenance. To ensure that your pool is never exposed to risks of flooding, you should always check the valves before you start any work. To do this, simply follow these steps:

  • Turn off the supply side of your pool (this is the part that connects to the city water supply and usually is located near the faucet).
  • Turn on the release side of your pool (this is the part that is located at the bottom of the pool and usually is connected to a garden hose or similar).

If everything is turned on correctly, you should see plenty of bubbles coming out of the tube that is connected to the spigot (this is the part that connects to the faucet). If you do not see any bubbles, check the following:

  • Is the valve on the release side closed?
  • Is there any foreign objects (such as a rock or large stick) in the inlet path?
  • Is there any debris (such as leaves or twigs) in the lines?

If everything is fine, double check the valves to be sure that they are both closed and then try increasing the pressure again. If the problem is still present, contact your local pool technician or pool store.

Learn How To Use The Pressure Gauge

So, you have just bought that brand new pool. Congrats! But, now that you have this piece of equipment in your backyard, you will want to work on increasing the pressure so that you can get the most out of your investment. Before you start messing around with the pressure, you should first make sure that your pool is functioning correctly. Once you have cleared that hurdle, you can start increasing the pressure. Here is a quick guide to help you out.

Learning how to use a pressure gauge is an easy enough task, however, you should always take time to read the instructions that come with the gauge (usually in the form of a booklet). This way, you will know how to properly use the tool and be able to take advantage of all its functions. Some pressure gauges have complicated interface screens, while others have simple pushbuttons. But no matter what type of interface you have, you should always be able to figure out how to operate it.

Raise The Pressure Slowly

When raising the pressure slowly, it is important to take into consideration the size of your pool. Some pools can only handle high pressures for short periods of time before they start showing signs of damage. If you have a small pool, you should always stay near the recommended pressure level and only increase it slowly (usually 1 PSI per 10 minutes). If you are using an analog gauge, you should start with the minimum point and slowly work your way up. Remember, too much water too fast can cause significant damage to your pool. Even if you do not see any signs of trouble yet, keep an eye out for any leaks or damaged areas in the pool. This is especially important if you have a smaller pool as you do not want to risk any kind of accident.

Protect Your Pool Against The Elements

As previously stated, your pool has two ways of releasing water into the tank. One is through the use of a pump and the other is by manually releasing the water. To ensure that your pool is always protected against the elements, you should always cover it with a waterproof barrier. This way, not even a tiny bit of water can get inside your pool deck area. Some materials that are commonly used for these types of barriers are listed below.

  • Scuba Nets
  • Tyvek Water-Resistant Sheeting
  • Dyneema (a type of synthetic fabric)
  • Rubbermaid Water-Saving Pool Liner

When choosing the material for your pool’s cover, it is important to remember that the texture and thickness of the material can affect the performance of your pool. For example, if you use a thick, rubber-like material for your pool’s cover, it will affect the way the water flows when released from your pool. Some materials, such as Rubbermaid’s, are designed for fast installation and offer quick protection against the elements. If you have a smaller pool, you can use one of these quick-drying products and save yourself the time and effort of using tape to seal the seams. If you are using a thicker material for your pool’s cover and it starts looking grimy after just a couple of months, it’s time for an upgrade! Try out some of the newer products on the market that offer an elegant look and feel. You should not have to hide your pool from the sunshine any longer!

Now that you have a pool and are ready to use it, you will want to work on increasing the pressure so that you can get the most out of it. To do this, simply follow the easy steps detailed above and you will be able to increase the pressure to the recommended level quickly and easily. Just make sure that you do not exceed the acceptable limit and risk hurting your pool in the process! Good luck out there.

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