How To Work Out Water Volume In A Pool? [Solved!]

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So you’ve just bought a pool. Congrats! Now it’s time to workout and make the most of your new toy. But how much water should you put in it? That is the question. In this article, we will discuss the various methods for measuring and predicting how much water your pool needs.

Pump And Temperature

The first thing you need to do is set the stage for proper operation by pumping out the water and adjusting the temperature. For this, you will need a pool pump and some kind of thermostat that can handle medium-sized pools (around 10,000 gallons).

Pumping out the water reduces the amount of algae and weed growth which is both good for your pool’s health as well as aesthetic appeal. Hence, you need to set a time every day, even if it’s just for a few minutes, that you will spend pumping the water. Ideally, you would like to see the water level at 2 inches below the rim of the pool. Some pools require a bit less water to be completely filled, while others need more. This is a case of trial and error until you find the sweet spot for your pool. Too little water, and you will find that the pool is not really usable. To put it bluntly, it will be difficult for anyone to drown in your pool! Too much water, and you will simply waste a lot of energy trying to keep up with it all. Remember that too much water can cause mold growth which is even more damaging to your pool’s health.

Dechlorination

Chlorine is a nutrient that encourages the growth of algae and other plants which deplete the oxygen in the water. To avoid this, you need to dechlorinate the pool water before you mix it with the pool chemicals. Remember that chlorination is a temporary fix at best and will only postpone the inevitable algae growth. In the long term, you will need to dechlorinate the pool water by purchasing a $5 one-time dechlorinator such as the Algae Destroyer by AquaDyne or the Chemical Free pool kit by Blue World Aquatics. These will effectively remove the chlorine in your pool.

Alkalinity

Alkalinity is the measure of the total amount of alkali in the pool. Alkali is a substance that gives water a slightly salty taste which can be damaging to your pool’s pH balance. For this reason, you need to maintain a proper alkalinity level in your pool by regularly testing the pH level and increasing or decreasing the amount of potassium additives accordingly. The best way to raise the alkalinity in your pool is by using a pool pH tester which can measure pH levels within 0.1 pH units. The most common and inexpensive sources of alkali are calcium carbonate and marble dust. A great way to keep track of your alkalinity level and ensure you stay at the desired level is to use a digital pool calculator which can be easily accessed from your smartphone. This will guide you on how much KH which is converted into H+ ions through the process of ionic interaction. Knowing the pH level of your pool is essential to understanding how much potassium you should add to it. For more on alkalinity, check out this article on how to maintain a proper pH level in your pool.

Ammonia And Nitrates

Ammonia and nitrates are compounds which are extremely toxic to fish and wildlife. Nitrates are also extremely damaging to the environment as they decompose into nitric oxide which is a gas that is extremely dangerous to humans. For these reasons, both compounds need to be kept at minimal levels which is why you should test for them frequently and reduce the amount of nitrogenous waste as much as possible. Ammonia and nitrates can be determined by testing for them in your pool’s water every month or two. You can use a $5 hand-held ammonia probe or even a digital pool analyzer for this which are both widely available on the market. If you have further questions about this, simply contact your local pool store or the Department of Agriculture Aquatic Weighing Station.

Iron And Manganese

Iron is an essential part of hemoglobin which gives red blood cells their color. It is also an important part of many enzymes that help cells metabolize food and oxygen effectively. Manganese is similar to iron in that it is an important part of many enzymes that are necessary for a healthy body. It is also present in the adrenal glands which help regulate stress levels. Both iron and manganese are very important to the survival of fish and wildlife which are a part of your pool’s ecosystem. For this reason, you should test for them frequently and make sure they stay at levels which are healthy for all living things.

Sulfates

Sulfates are not healthy in any way, shape, or form and you should keep them as low as possible. They accumulate in the pool’s water and eventually cause trouble when the level becomes too high. Your pool’s water should only contain a small amount of sulfates which is why you need to test for them frequently and reduce their amount as much as possible. Sulfates are usually the result of inadequate chlorination or a buildup of minerals from improper maintenance. If you suspect your pool to be high in sulfates, then your best course of action is to contact your local pool store or the Department of Agriculture and have them test the water for you. Remember that too much sulfation can lead to an overly acidic pH level which is also dangerous to the health of any living thing in your pool.

Once the water volume is set and the stage is set for proper pumping, it’s time to focus on how you will keep track of it all. For this, you will need a digital pool calculator which can be easily accessed from your smartphone. These will guide you on how much electricity to use based on the number of hours you will use your pool. They can also determine the number of days per week you should use your pool based on the size of it. Smaller pools require more frequent use whereas larger ones can be used more intermittently. If you have further questions about this, simply contact your local pool store or the Department of Agriculture Aquatic Weighing Station.

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