What Increases Pool Water Ph? [Facts!]

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One of the most important things to consider when designing a pool is the water quality. Having clean and clear pool water is both beneficial for your pool and its environment. While there are many reasons why your pool water may not be crystal clear, there are some specific things you can do to bring it to its best possible state. Sometimes, chemical cleaners or pool sanitizers can do the trick. Other times, you may need to change the water itself and/or its source. Knowing what increases the water’s pH level is a good start. Here are some of the most common things that affect the pH level of your pool water.

Swimming Pool Chemistry

When it comes to chemistry, everything is measurable. The pH level of your pool water is no different. The pH level of your pool water is directly related to the chemicals suspended in the water. The more alkaline (more pH levels) the water, the more likely it is to be cloudy and hazy. When the pH level drops below 7.2, you can start to see some serious algae growth in the pool. It is important to keep in mind, however, that the pH level of your pool water can vary depending on the time of day, the season, and various other factors. For example, rainfall can often be very acidic, possibly even moreso than typical pool water. If you live in an area where the air is particularly humid, it is possible for the pH level of your pool to drop significantly below 7.2. The type of fish you have in your pool will also affect the pH level as well. If you have tropical fish, for instance, their waste products can often cause the water to become more alkaline. In addition, tropical fish have a more vibrant coloring and tend to make the water closer to 8.0 in pH level. If you are ever unsure of the pH level of your pool water, it is usually a good idea to consult with the pool maintenance professional you hired to service your pool.

Filter Bacteria And Algae

Whether you believe it or not, your pool filters play an important part in keeping your pool water clean and clear. Without regular filter cleaning and changes, you will quickly end up with a thick layer of algae on your pool deck. This not only looks terrible but also poses a significant threat to your pool’s health. One of the most common types of algae that grows in fresh water is chlorophyll. This is largely because it is easy for algae to grow in areas where there is some sunlight. Another extremely common type of algae is cyanobacteria. Just like with chlorophyll, cyanobacteria will grow in areas with light and high water movement. If you want crystal clear pool water, you will have to keep a close eye on both these types of algae and remove them often with an Algae Destroyer or similar product. In some cases, removing algae can even mean the difference between keeping your pool or pond clean and being overrun by algae. It is important to keep in mind that different types of algae will require different types of treatments. For example, if you have a lot of green algae but no visible signs of cyanobacteria, you may only need to remove the green algae and allow the pool water to rest for a while before continuing with your usual cleaning regimen.

Water Temperature

Water temperature is perhaps one of the most important factors in keeping your pool water crystal clear. At the same time, it is also one of the most difficult to control. The temperature of your pool water is directly related to the climate where you are located. If you live in a cold climate, you will need to keep the water as cool as possible and use some form of heat pump to accomplish this. There are many negative impacts that extreme temperatures can have on your pool. For instance, the colder the water is, the more likely you are to see some degree of algal growth. The algae growth will be of a different type depending on the season, but it will still be there. The most harmful types of algae will usually only become visible in the winter months. The warmer the water, the more vibrant its coloring and the less likely it is to have any sort of algae growth. The ideal temperature for your pool is between 68-72 degrees Fahrenheit. If you believe your pool is getting a little warm, you can always drop the water temperature with some type of pool cooler.

Rainfall And Rising Tides

If you live in an area where heavy rainfall is a common occurrence, this will inevitably affect the pH level of your pool water. Just remember that not all rain is created equal. If you have adequate gutters and downspouts, the majority of the rain will be channeled away from the pool area. In cases where this is not possible, you will need to find ways to reduce the impact that rain has on your pool. One of the best things you can do for your pool is to install a rainwater tank. This will not only help reduce the amount of harmful chemicals that get into the water but will also help keep your pool water clean and clear.

Familiarity Of The Area

If you have not lived in an area where extreme weather patterns are common, you may not be familiar with all the factors that affect the pH level of your pool. The type of fish you have in your pool will also play a role in the pH level of your water. If you have goldfish, for example, their waste products will usually raise the pH level of your pool water. Just remember the area where you live can play a significant role in the pH level of your pool. If you have been exposed to more acidic rainfall before, this may predispose you to more algae growth in your pool. If this is the case, it may be a good idea to move to an area where there is less rainfall or where the rainfalls are more alkaline. Even still, you will need to be aware of how the area around you is affecting the pH level of your pool water. Familiarity of the area will also vary depending on whether you are cleaning your pool daily or weekly.

Light Is Important

While sunlight is often considered the best source of light for plants and algae, the opposite is true for the water in your pool. The light source has a lot to do with the pH level of your pool water. If you have a lot of windows looking out onto a bright area such as a lake or the ocean, this can often cause algae growth in large quantities. If you have a pool with a skylight or lots of sliding glass doors that lead to a deck, this can also cause algae growth. The solution is pretty straightforward – you can cover up the windows and doors with some type of light-blocking material so some light can still get in but less of it will be reflected onto your pool water. Even though sunlight is important for plants and algae, these are the things you need to keep away from your pool.

As you can see, there are many ways your pool water pH level can be controlled. Keep an eye on these factors and you will be well on your way to having crystal clear pool water. Just remember that sometimes these factors are beyond your control and there are various other things that affect the pH level as well. For example, chemical cleaners or pool sanitizers can often cause the water to become more alkaline. If you are ever unsure of the pH level of your pool or pond water, it is usually a good idea to consult with the pool maintenance professional you hired to service your pool.

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