Why Did My Pool Water Turn Green After Shocking It? [Updated!]

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I would love to know how many times I’ve shocked myself with my pool water! It turned green the day after I did it for the first time, and it wasn’t until recently that I found out why. I think it may have something to do with the pH value of the water changing, but it’s still very strange! It still hasn’t returned to its normal color, and I’m starting to wonder if it ever will.

The pH Value Of Pool Water

The pH value of pool water is important because it affects the overall look and feel of the water. For example, if the pH value is high, then the water will appear more brightly colored than if the pH value is low. For this reason, it’s important to maintain a proper pH value in your pool. You can do this by testing the water regularly with pH test strips or a simple pH meter (consult your pool service provider for specific meters).

What’s intriguing is that the pH value of pool water tends to change after you shock it. To give you a better idea of how this works, let’s examine the pH values of various fruit juices. Remember, the pH scale ranges from 0 to 14 (with 0 being the most acidic and 14 being the most basic).

  • Tropicana Juice: 2.9 – 3.3
  • Grapefruit (Citrus Grandis): 3.3 – 3.8
  • Mango (Mangifera Indica): 3.8 – 4.3
  • Pink Grapefruit (Citrus Grandis): 4.3 – 4.8
  • Strawberry (Fragaria Ananassa): 4.8 – 5.3

As you can see, the pH values of these fruits change after being squashed or chopped (depending on the size of the fruit). So if you’ve ever found your pool water turning green after you shocked it, then it may have been due to a change in the pH value of the water. It’s important to keep in mind that the pH value of pool water can change depending on several factors, including the size of the pool and the time of day (more acidic at night, less acidic during the day).

If you’re not sure why your pool water turned green after you shocked it, then follow these steps to figure it out. First, test the water for pH value using a simple pH meter or test strips.

The closer the pH value is to 7.2, the more ‘balanced’ and ‘healthy’ the color will be. However, if the pH value is too high (greater than 7.2), then the color will appear more ‘acidic’ and there will be too much ‘chlorine’ present in the water. Too much ‘chlorine’ is extremely dangerous for both the environment and the pool owner. For this reason, you should aim to keep the pH value of pool water between 7.2 and 8.4.

The Change In The pH Value Of Pool Water Is Normal

Having said that, changes in the pH value of pool water are normal and occur frequently after you shock it. This is due to the fact that chloramine is the byproduct of ‘chlorine’ and ammonia (both of which are very abundant in pool water after you shock it). The good thing is that these byproducts do not pose any serious threats to your pool or environment. They are easily removed using chlorine dioxide (which is less harmful than chlorine). To avoid any concerns, it is crucial to have your pool regularly serviced by a professional (this will ensure that your pool is always clean and healthy).

If your pool service provider hasn’t given you any warnings about your pool’s pH value, then there aren’t any immediate concerns associated with it. However, you should be aware that if this value gets too far out of whack (greater than 7.2 in the case of fruit juices), then there may be trouble (of a sort) down the road. The good thing is that you’ll be able to spot this problem long before it becomes an issue (assuming you test the pH value regularly). Remember, the pH value of pool water can change depending on a variety of factors (including the size of the pool and the time of day), so it is important to check for this value regularly.

Changes In The pH Value Of Pool Water Can Result In Strange Effects

Having said that, it is important to keep in mind that changes in the pH value of pool water can result in strange effects. For example, if the pH value drops significantly (greater than 4.6) after you shock it, then you may experience sudden changes in the behavior of your pool creatures (insects, snails and worms). While most invertebrates will simply move to different parts of the pool to avoid the toxic water, frogs and fish have been known to be affected by highly acidic water and may even kill each other at the bottom of the pool! While these effects are strange, they’re not particularly dangerous. As long as you know that this value can change and be somewhat unpredictable, then you’ll be able to handle it wisely. This is why I call for caution whenever the pH value of my pool changes, regardless of whether it goes up or down (and it goes up quite frequently)!

What Do I Do With My Pool Water Once I’ve Detected It?

Once you’ve detected that the pH value of your pool water has changed, then you need to do one of two things. Either switch to a different brand of pool water (if you’re trying to keep your pool healthy and the water is a problem for some reason) or you can add some chemicals to the pool to bring the pH value back in line (this process is known as ‘pH balancing’). The first option is generally preferable because it will keep the overall look and feel of your pool water consistent. Switching to a different brand of pool water will usually result in a better overall appearance (assuming your existing pool water is becoming apparent in bad color).

You can add different chemicals to your pool to achieve the perfect balance between acidity and alkalinity. For example, if you’ve determined that your pool water is very acidic (with a pH value of less than 4.6), then you can try adding some calcium chloride to raise the pH level (this is an alkaline substance that will combine with the acidity of the water to form basic calcium chloride, or ‘bicarbonate’). Bicarbonate is a neutral substance and does not affect the color of the pool water. It is, however, essential for aquatic life (bicarbonate is necessary for the formation of bones, shells and teeth in aquatic creatures).

If your existing pool water is bordering on being toxic (with a pH value of greater than 7.2), then it’s probably time to consider adding some chemicals to raise the pH value. Always remember that the addition of certain chemicals can be dangerous (especially if you exceed the recommended levels). To make sure that this value does not become unbalanced, you should always test the pH value of your pool water before and after adding these chemicals (be careful not to mix up the orders in which you add them!). As I’ve already mentioned, the pH value of pool water can change depending on several factors (including the size of the pool and the time of day), so it is important to check for this value regularly.

How Can I Tell If My Pool Is Too Acidic Or Too Alkaline?

As mentioned, the pH value of pool water can change depending on several factors, including the size of the pool and the time of day. For this reason, it can be hard to tell at first glance if your pool is too acidic or too alkaline. To help you figure this out, you can use pH test strips or a simple pH meter (consult your pool service provider for specific meters). Remember, always test the water for pH value before and after you shock it (this will help you see the effect of the water change more clearly).

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