Why Does Rain Water Turn My Pool Green? [Expert Guide!]

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You might be familiar with the expression “It’s raining cats and dogs.” That’s how most people would describe the sudden and unexplained appearance of frogs, birds, and other animals at the top of their pools. But what does the phrase actually mean?

Why does rain water turn my pool green? Find out in this blog post.

Depurative Powers

In the days before filtration systems became commonplace, people had to depend on nature to cleanse their pools. And so, the rain was appreciated for its cleansing properties, as it washed away the impurities left behind by bathing. This is why, during heavy rainfalls, it is often said that your pool will turn green with algae.

While there are many varieties of algae, including those that are quite beautiful, they all contribute to a pool’s malodorous odor. Some bacteria, too, can cause trouble if not removed through regular cleaning. When a pool is covered by a layer of algae, it is considered to be an unhygienic pool.

The Algae Link

When it comes to cleaning your pool, nothing is more frustrating than trying to scrape off the slimy stuff at the bottom! While some people are content to leave their pool decking as it is, others might choose to paint it or give it a quick wash with some hose water. But for those who want to get rid of the green stuff once and for all, there is a better way.

If you have heard of white-water rafting, it is likely that you have also heard of the term “pond scum” (sometimes also referred to as “water sludge”). That’s what is left behind after removing the dangerous algae from your pool. Imagine how wonderful it would be to simply scoop up that bit of gunk with your hands and dump it into a garbage can. But alas, that’s not likely to happen, is it?

White water rafting is a specialized sport that allows participants to float down rivers made completely of water. This provides the athlete with a unique perspective of the surroundings. During the descent, you might catch sight of some truly magnificent flora and fauna, including the occasional alligator or panther. But mostly, you will spot water lilies, lotus blossoms, and, of course, the ubiquitous signs of green algae. These are all quite dangerous to human health, especially when ingested. Still, the thrill of being amongst the world’s most beautiful and majestic water creatures is definitely something not to miss!

Protecting Your Pool

While the unpleasant odor of algae is not enough of a reason to banish it from your pool, there are other reasons why you might want to keep your pool’s algae at bay. Some algae, specifically the blue-green kind, is actually quite good at filtering water, much like the ecosystem in a rainforest. For this reason, if you live in an area with extreme rainfall, it is quite safe to assume that most of the water in your pool will be filtered through algae before being stored in your tank.

Unfortunately, this also means that most public pools are at risk of becoming algae-breathing tanks, until the proper filters are put in place. In general, pools without proper filtration systems should not be used by anyone, as the risk of contracting an infection from waterborne pathogens is just too great.

Why Does Rainwater Turn My Pool Green?

Why does rainwater turn my pool green? Find out in this blog post.

Most people are familiar with the expression “It’s raining cats and dogs.” That’s how most people would describe the sudden and unexplained appearance of frogs, birds, and other animals at the top of their pools. But what does the phrase actually mean?

Why does rainwater turn my pool green? Find out in this blog post.

In the days before filtration systems became commonplace, people had to depend on nature to cleanse their pools. And so, the rain was appreciated for its cleansing properties, as it washed away the impurities left behind by bathing. This is why, during heavy rainfalls, it is often said that your pool will turn green with algae.

While there are many varieties of algae, including those that are quite beautiful, they all contribute to a pool’s malodorous odor. Some bacteria, too, can cause trouble if not removed through regular cleaning. When a pool is covered by a layer of algae, it is considered to be an unhygienic pool.

Depurative Powers

In the days before filtration systems became commonplace, people had to depend on nature to cleanse their pools. And so, the rain was appreciated for its cleansing properties, as it washed away the impurities left behind by bathing. This is why, during heavy rainfalls, it is often said that your pool will turn green with algae.

While there are many varieties of algae, including those that are quite beautiful, they all contribute to a pool’s malodorous odor. Some bacteria, too, can cause trouble if not removed through regular cleaning. When a pool is covered by a layer of algae, it is considered to be an unhygienic pool.

The Algae Link

When it comes to cleaning your pool, nothing is more frustrating than trying to scrape off the slimy stuff at the bottom! While some people are content to leave their pool decking as it is, others might choose to paint it or give it a quick wash with some hose water. But for those who want to get rid of the green stuff once and for all, there is a better way.

If you have heard of white-water rafting, it is likely that you have also heard of the term “pond scum” (sometimes also referred to as “water sludge”). That’s what is left behind after removing the dangerous algae from your pool. Imagine how wonderful it would be to simply scoop up that bit of gunk with your hands and dump it into a garbage can. But alas, that’s not likely to happen, is it?

White water rafting is a specialized sport that allows participants to float down rivers made completely of water. This provides the athlete with a unique perspective of the surroundings. During the descent, you might catch sight of some truly magnificent flora and fauna, including the occasional alligator or panther. But mostly, you will spot water lilies, lotus blossoms, and, of course, the ubiquitous signs of green algae. These are all quite dangerous to human health, especially when ingested. Still, the thrill of being amongst the world’s most beautiful and majestic water creatures is definitely something not to miss!

Protecting Your Pool

While the unpleasant odor of algae is not enough of a reason to banish it from your pool, there are other reasons why you might want to keep your pool’s algae at bay. Some algae, specifically the blue-green kind, is actually quite good at filtering water, much like the ecosystem in a rainforest. For this reason, if you live in an area with extreme rainfall, it is quite safe to assume that most of the water in your pool will be filtered through algae before being stored in your tank.

Unfortunately, this also means that most public pools are at risk of becoming algae-breathing tanks, until the proper filters are put in place. In general, pools without proper filtration systems should not be used by anyone, as the risk of contracting an infection from waterborne pathogens is just too great.

Why Does Rainwater Turn My Pool Green?

Why does rainwater turn my pool green? Find out in this blog post.

Most people are familiar with the expression “It’s raining cats and dogs.” That’s how most people would describe the sudden and unexplained appearance of frogs, birds, and other animals at the top of their pools. But what does the phrase actually mean?

Why does rainwater turn my pool green? Find out in this blog post.

In the days before filtration systems became commonplace, people had to depend on nature to cleanse their pools. And so, the rain was appreciated for its cleansing properties, as it washed away the impurities left behind by bathing. This is why, during heavy rainfalls, it is often said that your pool will turn green with algae.

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